Hank Adams on the next edition of Make No Bones About It. 10-26-2014 at 5pm

Hank-Adams   Hank Adams, once described by Vine Deloria, Jr. as being “The most important Indian” in the country, will be sharing with us on KAOS 89.3 fm.  Hank is one of the iconic figures in the American Indian civil rights movement. An Assiniboine-Sioux from Montana, he moved to the Northwest as a youth and never left. It would be difficult to find an event during the turbulent 1960s and 1970s that Hank Adams was not involved in. He was a central figure in the struggle of the Northwest coast tribes to secure their inherent fishing rights. As a member of the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC), then later with his own organization which he founded and still directs – the Survival of American Indians Association – Adams helped to organize the first protests and “fish-ins.”

In 1971 he was shot in the stomach while guarding Indian fishing nets, allegedly by white fishermen. Adams and the other Indian fishing activists preserved, and eventually their acts of resistance not only helped bring about the landmark court case U.S. v. Washington – the Boldt decision – but proved to be the impetus for  an entire movement. Hank Adams was everywhere during this time period: Alcatraz, the Trail of Broken Treaties caravan, and Wounded Knee were just a few of the events in which he played a key role in. Adams was in many respects the “intellectual genius” of the movement, and wrote numerous position papers, including “The Twenty Points,” regarded as one of the most comprehensive Indigenous policy proposals ever devised.

Recently Dr. David E. Wilkins edited a collection of his best writings in a volume entitled The Hank Adams Reader (2012). In 2006, Indian Country Today named Hank as recipient of its third (Billy Frank, Jr. and Deloria being the first and second respectively) American Indian Visionary Award. Recently Hank Adams was awarded an honorary doctorate degree in Native leadership from Northwest Indian College.

Photo by Kimberly Adams

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz on “Make No Bones About It.” -October 26th, 2014 at 4pm

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Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother. Her grandfather, a white settler, farmer, and veterinarian, was a member of the Oklahoma Socialist Party and Industrial Workers of the World. Her historical memoir, Red Dirt: Growing Up Okie, tells that story. Moving to San Francisco, California, she graduated in History from San Francisco State University and began graduate school at the University of California at Berkeley, transferring to University of California, Los Angeles to complete her doctorate in History, specializing in Western Hemisphere and Indigenous histories, also active in the anti-Vietnam War. From 1967 to 1972, she was a full time activist and a leader in the women’s liberation movement that emerged in 1967, organizing in various parts of the U. S., traveling to Europe, Mexico, and Cuba. A second historical memoir, Outlaw Woman: Memoir of the War Years, 1960-1975, tells that story. In 1974, Roxanne joined the American Indian Movement (AIM) and the International Indian Treaty Council, beginning a lifelong commitment to international human rights, lobbying for Indigenous rights at the United Nations. Appointed as director of Native American Studies at California State University East Bay, she collaborated in the development of the Department of Ethnic Studies, as well as Women’s Studies, where she taught for 3 decades. Her 1977 book, The Great Sioux Nation: An Oral History of the Sioux Nation, was the fundamental document at the first international conference on Indians of the Americas, held at United Nations’ headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. Two more scholarly books followed: Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico and Indians of the Americas: Human Rights and Self Determination. In 1981, Roxanne was invited to visit Sandinista Nicaragua to appraise the land tenure situation of the Mískitu Indians in the isolated northeastern region of the country. In over a hundred trips to Nicaragua and Honduras, she monitored what was called the Contra War. Her book, Blood on the Border: A Memoir of the Contra War, was published in 2005. Her book, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States was published by Beacon Press in September 2014.

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Raven visits with Terry E. Beckwith about “The Return of Termination”, October 19th, 2014 at 5pm

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Terry E. Beckwith

Mr. Beckwith has worked in the Indian realty field for 40 years. He retired as Director, Palm Springs Office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. He was Area Realty Officer; Agency Realty Office; Chief, Land Titles & Records Office; Probate Examiner, Office of Hearings & Appeals.

Beckwith’s career included positions in the Pacific Region, Western Region, Southern Plains, and Northwest Region. Beckwith was on several task forces drafting regulations. He has taught classes for ICC since 1998. He has taught classes for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and American

Indian Training Center of the Desert. Beckwith graduated from Haskell Institute (now Haskell Indian Nations University) in 1970 and has received an Award in Accounting from UCLA.

Gary Bigbear on “Make No Bones About It.” October 19th, 2014 at 4pm

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Gary Bigbear

Since relocating from the Great Plains to the Pacific Northwest in 2002, I have experienced living in a more densely populated urban area juxtaposed with the diverse natural habitats of forests, mountains, coastlines, the Pacific Ocean and Salish Sea. I tend to get swept up in bold colors and sounds expressed through abstracted images from imagination.  While reflecting upon my surroundings—such as roundabouts, robins, tree-scapes, coyotes, and traffic—I am inspired to draw and paint about the still-wild spaces amidst growing urban development.

Through the mediums of drawing and painting, three veins of work have evolved. Urban Escapes is a series of oil paintings about my backyard and other surviving natural spaces in and around Olympia, WA; while Black and White Drawings and Expressionist Paintings reveal glimpses or memories of time, both past and present.  My goal is to allow my work to encompass the many common, everyday mysteries that provoke the life force in each of its forms.

GARY BIGBEAR ART

Buffalo Field Campaign – Olympia-October 10th, 2014

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BFC’s Campaign Coordinator Mike Mease will be hitting the road in September and October for a road show to Washington, Oregon, and California to share music, stories, video, and activism inspired by the Yellowstone bison. He’ll be joined by musicians Goodshield and Mignon Geli for what promise to be a handful of very special events. Please join BFC if you live in or near the following towns.

Friday, October 10, 7:00pm
Olympia, WA
Evergreen State College
2700 Parkway NW
Olympia, WA 98506
TESC Lecture Hall 1
Contact Jesse jesse_drescher@yahoo.com

Neils Chaske on “Make No Bones About It.” -September 28, 2014 at 4pm

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Neils Chaske

I am full blooded Dakota Sioux from Sioux Valley Dakota Nation. I was adopted and grew up in Pennsylvania. Over the many years I have traveled and saw many things and met great people along the way, In 1995 I reunited with my Family again, which I am very for.I have 4 and 2 boys who I very much, my will always be with me no matter where I go and me with them.They are my inspiration in my life. My Dream, vision and Passion is to help and All of my Relations in a Honorable,Respectful,humbling, good and Positive way. I am working on a few projects One I would like to announce,is where we are in Developing a Brand New Native American TV Program which is called “WHITE EAGLE SPEAKS” where we shall be bringing positive stories and topics from around the nation and around the world from many differant cultures.We shall touch the lives of many in a good and positive way if want to learn more, please email me I would be very happy to talk to you about this positive opportunuty we are developing.. Through White Eagle Speaks we shall have many people coming on to be interviewed with many different topics and issues from the many nations and also from around the world, where we shall be bringing many positive stories forward, from Elders, Activist, Business leaders, singers, actors, Professors, Drum Groups,Elders, Artist, Athletes, Chairman from many different Reservation’s, plus many other guest that has inspirational and Positive stories,and how they are helping and supporting the People, the children and Mother earth in a good and positive way.for all people and in particular for the children and Youth, who in turn shall become our leaders of tomorrow.We shall move forward together as one entity working for all People,children,youth,Elders,all of our four legged,all of our winged,the forest,the ,the air. For We are all connected on Motherearth.The time is now for all cutltures to Unite,for the creation for a brighter present and future.with one Heart,One Mind,and one Spirit To protect our Motherearth who gives each of us so much,To Inspire and teach our Children to never give up on there Dreams.Respect,Honor,each other and Motherearth. Mitakuye Oyasin (All My Relations).

Raven E. Heavy Runner on “Make No Bones About It.” September 21st, 2014 5pm

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Raven Heavy Runner of the Northwest Two-Spirit Society, will shared with us on KAOS radio 89.3 fm, September 21, 2014 at 5pm. Raven will shared his experiences identifying as Two Spirit person, and identify differences between gay culture and traditional Native culture. Thanks again Raven!